Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

The Corporate Callosum

TIME for a quick trip down memory lane. Today I have an article published in The Sunday Times, my journalistic alma mater, and it’s been at least 10 years since I have written a piece for them. The occasion is to mark 50 years of the launch of the Sunday Times Business News section. I was asked, as former Technology Correspondent, to write a piece of the top ten technologies that have most changed the world in the last 50 years.

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

A Hunch Over Lunch

I HAVE BECOME almost obsessively fascinated by the process of learning. I guess it stems from giving lectures, visiting schools, writing books that try to explain big subjects… – speaking with teachers – having my own kids – living with my own thoughts! It means, of course, that whenever I have time to read I almost always immerse myself in books about the human brain…

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

The Omnivore’s Dilemma

MICHAEL POLLANS brilliant book of the same title does a noble job of fusing evolutionary biology with everyday life, but actually the issue goes a great deal deeper than a history of the world in four square meals. One of the most profound questions you can pose to a class of curious kids is to ask them to list the biggest differences they can think of between humans and other mammals.

Wallbook Weekly

Connecting the dots of the past

CURIOSITY is our most precious natural instinct. It is how we learn all the most important life skills from talking to tickling from cradle to grave. But today knowledge is usually chopped up into separate subjects – into a timetable, a syllabus or curriculum – usually by adults who are addicted to measuring and recording a student’s progress through constant tests and examinations.

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

All The World’s A Stage!

THEY ARE WITH us from the moment we are born (perhaps before?) and stay with us until the day we die. They define us. Most people would agree that without them we are not human. I am referring to feelings. Nothing is more fundamental to our being.

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

Sunny Bonnington

IT IS ONE of the greatest privileges to spend all day with a range of children aged six to 11 and then the evening with their parents and the next day with their teachers in an teacher training workshop. If ever there is an opportunity to have an impact then surely this is it. The child, their parents and their teachers – all three points in the triangle of stakeholders surrounding any curious young mind.

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

The Power of Non-Fiction

ENGLAND, WE HAVE A PROBLEM. According to the latest Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) education report our young adults have amongst the lowest literacy rates of any country in the modern industrialised world. England came 22nd out the 24 countries surveyed.

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

It’s a small small world…

I AM BACK in Japan. This time just for a week, but it’s action packed. Six lectures in all, but the final one on Tuesday is the one that matters most. It’s at the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, in front of an audience of about 600, where I get to give my take on the future of planet, life and people over the next 1,000 years in the light of a warming climate and the relentless rise in human populations.

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

If a child gets bored at school, blame the system

SHE LOVED READING. She always asked questions. Her mind was a cauldron of effervescent eagerness, never idling, ever curious…That was ten years ago when Matilda, our eldest daughter, then aged nearly 7, was brimming with excitement about heading off into a new academic year at her school in Kent.

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

From Stone Age to present day in one huge wallchart!

Imagine spending a year working on giant jig-saw puzzle that starts in the Stone Ages and then travels through time to the present day, featuring 1,000 of the most amazing moments in the story of science and engineering… Now try turning it into a book!

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

Our island nations and Mr Gove

I VERY NEARLY didn’t make it. The roads from Oakwood School, near Chichester, to just past Guildford were fine, but then an all too typical Thursday late afternoon nightmare began to unfold on the A3 and stretched out all the way to Heathrow on the M25. I arrived at check-in 5 minutes after it had closed, my skin saved only, I reckon, by the look of total desperation on my face and my slightly askew bow tie.

Chronicles, Wallbook Weekly

1066 and all that….

NEXT WEEK I shall be speaking at the Chalk Valley History Festival. Normally I would roll out my history of the world in 60 minutes – starting with the Big Bang and running through 20 of the most amazing moments in world history to the present day. But not next week. The festival organiser, historian James Holland, has taken it upon himself to modify the title of my talk so it begins at 1066 – giving it a rather different trajectory……