Chronicles

King Harold falls at Hastings as Normans invade England

THEY SAY that a month is a long time in politics. It’s even longer if you are an eleventh-century English king. On 25 September, the English king Harold Godwinson celebrated a magnificent victory at Stamford Bridge, in Yorkshire, after defeating an army of Norwegian invaders. But less than three weeks later he lay dead on a battlefield near Hastings, on the south coast, after his army was annihilated by French forces led by William, Duke of Normandy.

Chronicles

Olympics hailed as a triumph

At an ancient sanctuary in one of Greece’s most far-flung corners a historic race took place yesterday between athletes from across the known world.

Chronicles

Long may she reign over us!

Queen Elizabeth II yesterday became the longest-reigning monarch in British history.
Our chief reporter charts some of the biggest changes in British life during her reign

Chronicles

The Secrets of Stonehenge Shrouded in Mystery

WHAT WAS the ancient purpose of Stonehenge? Speculations about its function range from a druid temple or a lunar calendar to a centre for healing and hero-worship. However, a startling new theory suggests that the world-famous circle of monumental megalithic standing stones may once have supported a raised wooden platform for prehistoric stargazers.

Chronicles

World’s greatest scientist dies at the age of 84

THE TOWERING GENIUS of our age Sir Isaac Newton died yesterday in London, aged eighty-four, from a stone obstructing his bladder. Sir Isaac was a colossus of science, standing astride the old world of magic and the new age of reason. While he practiced the traditional arts of Alchemy and Biblical Prophesy, he will perhaps be best remembered for his groundbreaking advances in Physics, Optics, Astronomy and Mathematics.

Chronicles

Great Fire Destroys London

THE GREATEST FIRE to sweep London in modern times has finally been put out, but not before it destroyed the medieval heart of the city and claimed the lives of an unknown number of citizens. Seventy thousand people have been left homeless by the blaze, writes our London correspondent on 6 September 1666.

Chronicles

Celtic Queen sets light to London

THE PORT of Londinium today lies in smouldering ruins. Its population is either dead or has fled, and a thick pall of smoke can be seen for miles. This wealthy if little-known commercial centre on the north bank of the River Thames is the latest victim of the violent campaign of resistance against Roman rule by the tall, red-headed Boudicca, queen of the Iceni tribe and leader of the British Celtic revolt.

Chronicles

What’s in our Primordial Soup?

IMAGINE venturing into the oceans in a time machine. Set the dial for 2 billion years ago, what ancient life forms might we expect to see? Sharks? Jellyfish? Ammonites, perhaps?

Chronicles

Water from outer space

Did you know that the water from your tap probably landed on earth from space over 4 billion years ago? Something to think about next time you're drinking a glass or taking a shower!

Chronicles

How about a game of prehistoric eye-spy?

There are a few life defining moments in our prehistoric evolution and one of them has to be the ability to see clearly. It seems that a carnivorous beetle-like creature called a trilobite got there first - about 536 million years ago!

Chronicles

What on Earth? Christmas myth-busters

Did you know Turkey first became popular with the American Settlers because that’s what happened to be living on their doorstep at the time? Find out about the surprising origins of a few more of our Christmas traditions.